Katherine Reay – Many Forms of Romance

Hi friends!

Welcome to the 5th Annual Read-A-Romance Month!

While I read romance all year long, August is the month we celebrate this awesome genre! Come back every day to read all three “Power of Romance” posts. Check out the full calendar of authors here. You can also find links to the last four years’ posts from the boxes in the sidebar, and if you’d like, you can follow RARM on Facebook.

Happy August!

#LoveRomance #ThePowerOfRomance

 

Romance, and Love Beyond Romance

The Power of Romance.

A review for my latest book opened…  Romance novelist Reay (Dear Mr. Knightley) crafts another engaging and sprightly page-turning bildungsroman…  It was a wonderful start to a review – and it ended equally well. But it took me some time to get to that ending because the first two words stopped me. Romance novelist…

I hadn’t realized I write romances. I write stories about women who need many forms of love in their lives – the traditionally “romantic” kind often being secondary. But it got me to thinking about The Power of Romance – and I learned two things: 1) Romance is terribly powerful stuff and 2) I do, in fact, write romances.

Romance is commonly defined as a novel, movie, or genre of popular fiction in which characters fall in love or begin a romantic relationship. (Thank you, Dictionary.com.) Putting aside the fact the website used the word when defining the word, it does match our common interpretation. We tend to agree that romance denotes those beginning heart-palpating, starry-eyed, swooning, rose-blush glowing moments at the beginning of a relationship – and romance ends with “Happily Ever After.”

But is that all there is?

I contend the word and its definition embody something bigger and broader, and far more significant. Not that those relationships and those feelings are insignificant, but there is so much to our lives and the romance of living them. In Dear Mr. Knightley, Sam needed the love and commitment of parents as much as she desired Alex. In Lizzy and Jane, Lizzy needed her sister, and her sister’s love and forgiveness, first and foremost. In A Portrait of Emily Price, Emily needed to learn how to love well – herself, her life, her family and her new husband.

When we keep romance defined tightly to the common and contained definition, we deplete its power. We may not all have a “Happily Ever After” romance in our lives at the moment, but we do have love – in some of its many and varied forms. These are romances and they carry significant weight and importance in our everyday. And these are the “romances” that often last a lifetime, deserving our care and cultivation in both little and large moments.

So while I will definitely put effort into those first heart-throb glances in each and every story I write, I will continue to write romances that enfold characters in broader love stories, surrounding characters with as many forms of love I can discern – with the hopes that you’ll enjoy each and every one. :o)

Katherine recommends:

Kristy Cambron  –  www.kristycambron.com  –  @Amazon

Kristy writes wonderful time-split and layered romances that carry an enticing lyricism that sweeps you away.

Sarah Ladd  –   www.sarahladd.com  –  @Amazon

Sarah writes beautiful Regency stories in which the main characters actively work out their happy endings in both life and love. Her descriptions and prose are so rich and full you want to live within them.

 


Questions for the Author:

Tell us about a moment when you felt or were aware of the power of romance.

I’m casting back to about the eighth grade when I first read Pride and Prejudice. Darcy and Elizabeth – the sparring, the interest, the longing, the declarations – made me realize that not only did such emotions exist, but that writers had the power to create them, or reveal them, with words.

Tell us about an object that has powerful memories for you.

I have a doll’s trunk in my attic from my childhood. As a kid, it sat under my bed and was filled with my journals – though I am sure when I began writing them at age 10 I called them “diaries.” I have gotten rid of the journals, but I don’t think I’ll ever give away the trunk. To me, it represents the safe place that can hold your secrets.

Tell us about a word that has power for you.

Magnanimous.

I have always loved that word – its meaning and the way it rolls off the tongue. Wouldn’t you want to be that kind of person? Not only one who forgave, but was noble and kind and exuded those qualities at such a high level that you radiated them, and the word itself? I would.

Tell us about a powerful book you read this year (or one that’s so powerful you’ve never forgotten it).

The Life of Pi. I read it, years ago, soon after publication – so I hadn’t heard about the ending and the movie was years away. I loved the writing and poured over every sentence. Each was structured with a different quality and cadence – and the descriptions were so vivid – more than anything I’d encountered before. Then came the ending. It was one of the first times ever that I didn’t anticipate the twist and I was blown away.

Tell us about a person who’s had a powerful influence on your life.

My first agent. He took a chance on me – he returned my unsolicited phone call and offered to help me. He also, in that first call, insisted he would not take me on as a client. Yet a week later, after reading the manuscript for Dear Mr. Knightley, he called and said he wanted to work with me. But, while that was an extraordinary day, it’s not why I mention him here… We worked together for only a year before he died of cancer. In that year, he taught me an extraordinary amount about writing and publishing. He gave me so much of his time and attention. Most importantly, he taught me a tremendous amount about charity, caring, and treating others with grace, respect and kindness. He simply embodied all of those qualities and was one of the best men I’ve ever known. I’ll never forget him or stop being thankful he was in my life.

Main Drawing:

Katherine is generously giving away a copy of A Portrait of Emily Price and a coffee tumbler.  To enter, leave a message below by 11:59 pm PST August 5, 2017. (US only)

She is also contributing more books and another coffee tumbler to the bundles, and sponsoring a tote & cup combo! (see below for more information)

There are many more drawings —including international book bundles! See the bottom of the post for more information.

#LoveRomance  #HappyReading

 


Katherine Reay is the award-winning author of Dear Mr. Knightley, Lizzy & Jane and The Bronte Plot, an ALA Notable Book Award Finalist. Her latest novel, A Portrait of Emily Price, received Starred Reviews from Publishers Weekly, Library Journal and a Romantic Times TOP PICK! All Katherine’s novels are contemporary stories with a bit of classical flair. She holds a BA and MS from Northwestern University and is a wife, mother, rehabbing runner, former marketer, and avid chocolate consumer.

After living all across the country and a few stops in Europe, Katherine now happily resides outside Chicago, IL.

 

Learn more:

www.katherinereay.com   |    Facebook     |     Twitter @katherinereaybooks

 

Buy Katherine’s books:

availableon-amazon       availableon-nook    availableon-kobo

*Please note that the Amazon button, most cover images and many text links connect to a Read-A-Romance Month affiliate portal. Thanks so much for your help & support!

#LoveRomance   #The PowerofRomance    #ReadARomance


MORE DRAWINGS!

Each RARM post will have one main drawing each day (posted above). Authors are also contributing to weekly bundles, which will be drawn at the end of the week. Each bundle will consist of at least five books and the amount of bundles will depend on the amount of books the authors contribute.

To enter to win these bundles, send an email to Week1@ReadARomanceMonth.com with “Bundles” in the signature line. (1 entry per email address per week)

International friends!

Rather than individual drawings off posts, this year we’ll do sets of books, 3+, depending on how many authors contribute. To enter, send an email to Week1@ReadARomanceMonth.com with “International” in the signature line. (1 entry per email address per week)

Week 1 contests are through Aug. 8

For the 5th Annual Read-A-Romance Month, many of the contributing authors are supporting an extra-special drawing – high quality tote bags and mugs printed with a fun, pro-romance image (see below).

Read-A-Romance Month, through the generous support of many of the authors, is giving away at least 30 mug & tote combos.

Plus, at least two lucky winners will win a Read-A-Romance Month “Month of Books” Mega Bundle, consisting of 31 books!

To enter these exciting drawings,  send an email to August@ReadARomanceMonth.com (US only, apologies to international friends – though keep an eye out later in the month. I may include a couple of international bundles.)

You will not be automatically added to a newsletter, and I promise not to sell or give your email addresses to anyone. I do reserve the right to send you an invitation to sign up for my newsletter, which will also have opportunities to win more prizes and great romance reading tips!

 

 

Check out all three great posts everyday in August at ReadARomanceMonth.com.  Or you can find the posts on the RARM Facebook page.  Also consider joining the Read-A-Romance Book Club page, where we discuss romance of all kinds and will have drawings and events throughout the year.

#LoveRomance  #HappyReading  #ReadARomance

  • Kelly Jetzer

    I couldn’t agree more about Life of Pi. What a powerful story!

  • Anna

    “Sprightly” – not a word you read every day! I’ll definitely be adding your books to my TBR pile. Thanks! 🙂

  • cheryl c.

    Pride and Prejudice was one of my first romances, too.

  • Alyn Yang

    Magnanimous does feel nice to say.

  • rebecca moe

    I’ve been meaning to pick up your books–they sound lovely! Thanks for posting 🙂

  • Arletta Bartel Boulton

    Love Katherine’s books! I hope there are more Austen books in her (and my) future.

  • Patty Rude

    I have not read any of Katherine’s books, but I have one in my TBR stack!

  • April Kirkland

    Hmm I have not read Life of Pi as of yet and have not seen the movie. You have definitely peaked my interest though! Going to add it to mount to be read pile.

  • Sally Schmidt

    I agree. I think the best books have romance in them, whether they are called Romances or not, and not just the heart-throb kind of love but the love we share with so many around us. Pride and Prejudice is one of my favorites but the one that always does is for me is Persuasion. Maybe time for another read and watch the DVD too.

  • Diane Estrella

    I’ve read Katherine’s first book but need to catch up on her latest. Thanks for the chance to win!
    dianemestrella at gmail dot com

  • Sue G.

    Nice write up. Love is important in your life, no matter what form you can it in!

  • Nicole Marie

    Great post, I look forward to reading your books!

  • Patty Vasquez

    I love the broader definition of romance as you’ve written about it here. I know my husband loves me- and we definitely had our romantic moments in our courtship days. However, when I look into the adoring eyes of my dogs, I know there is an ever-lasting romance there, one that is as important to me as it is to my furry boys.

  • Melissa Cowling Terry

    Great post. I also believe that love comes in many forms.

  • Molly

    I love pride and prejudice.

  • Nicole A.

    I have read two of Reay’s books and loved them both. I can’t wait to read more! I enjoyed this post, especially the little revelation about the doll’s trunk. 🙂

    • Read-A-Romance

      Hi Nicole!

      You’re the winner of Katherine’s main giveaway!

      You should be hearing from me via email later today at the email address you signed in with here.

      Congratulations! xo

      Bobbi
      RARM

  • Pamby50

    I love that you didn’t think you wrote romance stories. I have never read Life of Pi but I should put this on my list.